Monthly Archives: April 2014

The 5 Best Languages to Learn for the 21st Century

There are a lot of languages out there and choosing the right one to learn is a big question. If you’re reading this right now, then you already know English which is undeniably the most important language to learn in the 21st century. What about after that? Of course, pursuing your personal interests is always one of the best options. But what if you want to study a language that will prove to be notably important and useful in our increasingly globalized world? What are the most useful languages to learn in the 21st century?

 

Portuguese

Portuguese is the 6th most spoken language in the world with 220 million native speakers. Most notably known as the language of Brazil, Portuguese is also spoken by notable populations in Portugal, Angola, and Mozambique. Brazil is one of the world’s greatest recent economic success stories, with an enormous and growing middle class. The country’s image, and in turn business prospects, is sure to only improve with the coming 2014 Brazil World Cup and 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympics. Angola as has also been booming recently, with one of the highest economic growth rates in the world. Given the current positioning of Portuguese vis-a-vis Brazil in particular, there is no question that the language will become ever-more-important this century.

Keep an eye out for OpenLanguage Portugese coming soon!

 

Russian

Russian is the 8th most spoken language in the world with 155 million native speakers and is an official language of the United Nations.. These speakers are stretched out over a huge swath of land from a number of former USSR republics in Eastern Europe through to Russia which extends all the way to East Asia. In recent years, Russia and other Russian-Speaking former-USSR republics have played host to surging economies, in part due to large populations now participating in the global economy and the significant reserves of natural resources, all of which will give those with a knowledge of Russian great advantages in the business realm this century. Recent international disputes involving Russia and the Ukraine also highlight the continued strategic importance of this language in the post-Cold War era.

Try out a complimentary Russian course on OpenLanguage today.

 

Arabic

Arabic is the 5th most spoken language in the world with 295 million native speakers. Arabic is spoken across the Middle East, North Africa, and the Arabian Peninsula and is an official language of the United Nations. The Arabic-speaking world is home to extremely disparate countries and populations, some economically vibrant and playing an increasingly important role in globe such as Qatar and Dubai and others, like Syria, embroiled in intractable warfare and the focus of international security and welfare efforts. With nations and populations in all positions between those two ends of the spectrum, it’s undeniable that a knowledge of Arabic will help you engage with what is one of the most dynamic regions of the world.

Try out a complimentary Arabic course on OpenLanguage today.

 

Spanish

Spanish is the 2nd most spoken language in the world with 405 million native speakers and is an official language of the United Nations. Spanish is the official language of Spain and the majority of countries in Latin America from Central America down to the bottom tip of South America, in addition to being widely spoken in the United States and Canada. Despite the global economic downturn in 2008, Latin American economies have continued to post strong and stable growth rates in recent years. In countries like Mexico, Colombia, and Chile, strong middle classes are emerging that are tech-savvy, educated, and ready to engage the world. The huge potential of the populations of Spanish-speaking Latin America is only now starting to show itself, and a knowledge of Spanish will ensure that you’ll be able to explore this world as it blossoms.

Try out a complimentary Spanish course on OpenLanguage today.

 

Chinese

Chinese (Mandarin) is the most spoken language in the world with 955 million native speakers and is one of the official languages of the United Nations. Spoken predominantly in mainland China, Mandarin is also spoken in Taiwan, Singapore, and throughout the Chinese diapsora. Everyone everywhere as of late has been talking about China’s economic rise of the last few decades, with the country looking to become the largest economy in the world very soon. With hundreds of millions of Chinese now looking to do business and travel in the rest of the world, a knowledge of Chinese will open up enormous opportunities in the 21st century.

Try out a complimentary Chinese course on OpenLanguage today.

 

5 Ways to Actually Learn a Language

Learning a new language is a goal many of us have but few of us ever achieve. OpenLanguage provides a highly-effective, convenient, and entertaining language learning system that will put you on the road to linguistic success. In addition to an effective learning system, however, it’s important to focus on how you approach learning a language. Here are some key ways that will help ensure that you don’t just study a language but that you actually learn it.

1. Choose a language you actually want to learn

The fundamental thing that will result in language learning success is of course motivation – you can have all the resources in the world, but if you’re not up to using them you’ll get no where. Thus to be truly successful in learning a language, it’s best choose one that you really want to learn. Maybe you have a close friend that speaks Spanish that you would like to be able to communicate with in their native language. Maybe your company also does business in China and learning Chinese will help advance your career. Or maybe you love Japanese films and want to be able to understand them in their original language. Whatever the reason, choosing a language that motivates you enough to push through those periods of difficulty is the key first ingredient in the recipe for language learning success.

 

2. Find ways to connect the language to the real world

Language learning is traditionally the stuff of classrooms, water-damaged textbooks, and endless repetitive exercises. What this method fails to acknowledge is that language is about people, not words and grammar points. And, believe it or not, the people that speak the language you want to learn do not live on page 76, exercise 3; they live in the real world, using that language to talk to parents, write work emails, and fall in love. Seek out ways to connect the language you’re studying to the worlds where its actually spoken. This could mean finding music or TV shows in that language to see what native speakers are into, seeking out versions of the websites you love to find out how they actually talk about stuff, or (of course) finding someone who speaks that language natively to chat with. In doing this, you’ll better understand how the language is used and feels when spoken by real people, which is almost always different from how it is used and feels when being taught from a textbook. OpenLanguage is unique in that it provides real language taught by real people, making this real world connection a central part of your studies. Through this real world connection, the language you’re studying will go from feeling like a fossil that you study as a specimen to being a living, breathing thing that you actually want to continue to get to know.

 

3. Try to continue studying even when you’re not “studying”

It’s easy to study for a little bit and then go on with your day without ever once thinking about what you were learning earlier. But to really internalize a language, which is the ultimate goal when studying a language, you have to bring that language with you wherever you go. You’re walking to your car – how do you say “car” in Italian? You head to the store to buy some bread – what’s the right way to say “bread” in Arabic? You just remembered that you need to call your friend – how do you say “I call my friend” in French? By teaching your brain to constantly think about the language you’re learning, it will become second nature to constantly reinforce everything you’ve been learning.

 

4. Go back

Make a point of regularly going back to things you’ve previously studied. You may be years into your studies, but upon returning to beginner topics you may be surprised to find things that you’ve been doing incorrectly all along. Often times these things that were glossed over earlier on in your studies will add a great deal to your now more advanced abilities. Most importantly, going back is an important motivational tool: remember that lesson that was once so difficult for you to understand? Go back and listen to it after a few months of studying and realize how much you’ve progressed.

 

5. Make your learning your own

People love to make big statements about one-size-fits-all language learning tricks, but the bottom line is that you have to make your learning your own. Did that trick or method of studying that you just tried work? Keep doing it. Are you learning Russian in order to communicate effectively during a month vacation in Russia and don’t care much about being able to write the alphabet? Then focus on speaking. Do you only feel like learning how to talk about food and don’t care about learning hospital-related vocabulary? Then food it is. Learning a language is about enriching your life and reaching your goals, and getting there requires initiative on your part to find the method and approach that fits your needs.